Rug Cleaning

Rug Cleaning Studio

Experts in specialist cleaning of all types of rugs, including Persian, oriental, indian, woollen, shagpile, viscose, polyester….and many more

For all your rug cleaning enquiries, questions or advice

Please call me on 029 2081 0692 or

Email RugCleaning@MrJonesCleaning.com

Or, simply fill in the contact form at the bottom of this page

All rugs now cleaned at our shop

Click Rug Cleaning Shop for more details

Surface Clean or Submerge Clean…Which Rug Cleaning Method Would You Use?

If I were you, I’d always choose the ‘Submerge Clean’ method for rug cleaning!

Here lies the problem! Not all rugs can be ‘submerge cleaned’. Knowing which rugs can be ‘submerge cleaned’ and which ones have to be ‘surface cleaned’, should be left to expert rug cleaners. Getting it wrong ruins your rug forever! What is the difference between ‘Surface Cleaning’ and ’Submerge Cleaning’?

Surface Clean
This method is adopted by most carpet cleaners who really don’t know how to thoroughly clean rugs! It is the same method used for cleaning fitted carpets, commonly known as ‘Hot Water Extraction’. The method involves applying a cleaning solution to the surface of the rug, which then breaks down the dirt and grease. A powerful vacuum is then used to extract the ‘slurry’ from the carpet.

‘Scrub Cleaning Rugs’

Scrub cleaning rugs is the most popular rug cleaning method. Watch this video to see the process from start to finish.

Scrub cleaning of rugs is just £1.00 per square foot (£11.00 per square metre) and £5 each way for pick up/delivery.

Which means, an average size fireside rug, (6 x4) costs just £24.00 to scrub clean.

Call now for more information, 029 2081 0692

Submerge Clean
This method should only be attempted by qualified rug cleaning technicians who know what they are doing! Step one is to remove any ‘dry soil’ not only from the surface, but also from the bottom of the pile where normal vacuuming cannot reach. After dry soil removal, the rug is then submerged in a specially designed flat bath containing the appropriate cleaning solution to solve the cleaning problem (urine contamination, general dirt, grease, food, drink etc). Knowing which solution to place the rug in is only a small problem compared to knowing which rugs can be submerge cleaned. The rug is submerged for up to 3 days (depending on the problem). The rug must then be thoroughly rinsed to remove all traces of cleaning solutions. The next problem is drying the soaking rug as quickly as possible, using specially designed drying environments. Again, only true rug cleaning masters know how to do this.

Why would you choose to ‘surface clean’ a rug when ‘submerge cleaning’ is obviously a more thorough clean?
Surface cleaning is a fantastic way to clean a rug, most dirt, grease etc sit on the surface of rugs and surface cleaning removes this. Because there is more dirt, dust etc sitting at the bottom of the pile, rugs cleaned the surface clean method, need cleaning more often! Leaving small particles at the bottom of the pile causes the pile to wear down more quickly!

Submerge cleaning is the only way to thoroughly clean a rug but …
Only certain rugs can be submerge cleaned (usually, the very highly priced quality rugs), some rug backings are prone to shrinkage, some rugs are bonded and submerge cleaning would destroy the bonding and the rug would fall apart. Knowing which cleaning method to use should be left to expert rug cleaners.

If you have a rug that you want cleaned – thoroughly, and you don’t know if it can be ‘submerge cleaned’?
Then, call me – as a master fabric cleaner, I can guide you to the best method for cleaning.

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